District energy in cities – UNEP Report

The development of ‘modern’ district energy (DE) systems is one of the best options, according to the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) in a new publication: District energy in cities – unlocking the potential of energy efficiency and renewable energy. Launched at the International District Energy Association’s (IDEA’s) annual conference last month, the report calls for the accelerated deployment of DE systems around the world. The full report is available here.

 

The District Energy in Cities Initiative will support national and municipal governments in their efforts to develop, retrofit or scale up district energy systems, with backing from international and financial partners and the private sector. The initiative will bring together cities, academia, technology providers and financial institutions in a joint ambition to build the necessary capacity and transfer of know-how while engaging all stakeholders and reducing emissions. Twinning between cities – matching champion ones with learned ones will be a key component of the new district energy in cities initiative to scale up lessons learned and best practices.

 

19 cities around the world have indicated interest in joining the initiative. In addition to Danfoss, eleven other private sector and industry associations’ partners commit to contribute technical. In addition to UNEP, six intergovernmental and government organisations as well as networks are interested to support the new initiative and to facilitate technological expertise. This new initiative is being co-ordinated by UNEP and Danfoss with lead partners ICLEI and UN-Habitat. A key finding was that LOCAL GOVERNMENTS ARE UNIQUELY POSITIONED TO ADVANCE DISTRICT ENERGY SYSTEMS in their various capacities as planners and regulators, as facilitators of finance, as role models and advocates, and as large consumers of energy and providers of infrastructure and services (e.g., energy, transport, housing, waste collection, and wastewater treatment). This was something I wrote about in previous blogs on this site. See: Waste, Steam and District Heating in Nottingham; Can we be transparent on District Heat Data?; 4th Generation Heat Networks; Cities Take the Lead on District Energy

 

 

 

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4 thoughts on “District energy in cities – UNEP Report

  1. Pingback: Disquiet among Danish city’s residents over Apple district heating deal – Cogeneration & On-Site Power Production | Sustainable Smart Cities

  2. District cooling is a multi-billion dollar industry in the Middle East, with demand climbing and no sign of a slowdown in sight.

    http://www.cospp.com/articles/print/volume-16/issue-5/features/district-cooling-heats-up.html?eid=295179875&bid=1183521

    District cooling systems deliver chilled water from a central plant through an underground pipe network to multiple buildings. The water circulates through refrigeration coils, or enters the air conditioning system through absorption chillers. The energy needed to drive the chillers can come from multiple sources including waste heat from power plants or industrial processes; steam turbines, or electric chillers. The cooling water can be fresh water, seawater or treated sewage effluent (TSE), a relatively new source of cooling water within the industry.

  3. Pingback: District level heating could help achieve EU 2020 energy efficiency goals | Sustainable Smart Cities

  4. Pingback: The Hot Flush Draining You of Heat … Plug it (in). | Sustainable Smart Cities

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